Sunday, 21 February 2010

From the gut - not a book

National Communism was the belief that emerged after World War II and held that the so-called workers or socialist states of Eastern Europe and elsewhere should follow a distinct national road to socialism - not an alien model imported from outside (ie the USSR). This was in order that the ruling Communist elites would thereby gain legitimacy in the eyes of the people they governed. Respective Communist parties played up pre-existing national identities, heroes, histories and myths in order to satisfy the people's natural anti-Imperialism, tribalism and cultural identity. For example, in the GDR the Communist Party made great play of glorifying Richard Wagner and Frederick the Great.

The experience of National Communism is very telling - Marxists soon found that they could not suppress the national and tribal spirit (just as they also found they could not suppress man's natural inclination towards spirituality) so they had to make concessions. Marxist elites have never managed to wipe these tendencies out. They recognised how powerful, ingrained and hard wired they were. No government anywhere has had to appease a Marxist spirit - it doesn't exist, it is an academic venture. Sure, all over the world for hundreds and hundreds of years the elites have had to deal with various prevailing manifestations of justice from below, but Leftism is an artificial phenomenon that has continually had to adapt to fit human realities. One major concession is the leftist championing of national liberation/self determination. By acknowledging the urge for national sovereignty, Internationalists have had to acknowledge tribal differences.

In Britain the National Communist current is currently present with the Left's celebration of the native Levellers, Diggers, Chartists, Peasant's Revolt and so on. It is also present within the 'official' Communist Party of Britain. The CPB's programme The British Road to Socialism outlines the necessity of a distinct native road to Socialism, due to how institutions of state and the economy have developed and evolved with a national character, different from other countries. Why is this? Because the people of the home nations made them - through their own uniqueness.

Some Leftists still willfully disregard national destinies as reactionary distractions, or even deny their existence - but they do so at their peril. By denying human truths they will remain in isolation.

In 1990 Billy Bragg (whom Berrocscir's Banner considers a talented lyricist and musician) rewrote the lyrics to The Internationale, the famous Leftist hymn.
One line was
In our world poisoned by exploitation, those who have taken, now they must give
And end the vanity of nations - we've but one Earth on which to live
This displays perfectly the arrogance of Internationalism. Blood ties, kinship and the reality of cultural difference are not vanity. What IS vanity is textbook academic theory imposing its will on the varied peoples of the world and seeking to deny them diversity. Maybe these days Billy won't be so condemning now that he's gone all patriotic in a liberal kind of way - there's nothing shameful in changing your mind, ol' Berrocscir here should know!

Nationalism as we understand it today is a 19th century construct. But it's organic foundations - tribal loyalty, identity, social bonds, kinship and cultural realities - these go back into the mists of time. They are a stronger basis for human relationships than some old fellow sat in the British Library.

Monday, 15 February 2010

Open for business - the EIP

From the ashes of the civic-nationalist Free England Party, the website of the newly relaunched English Independence Party went live yesterday. It owes its existence to those in the leadership of the FEP who converted to an ethnic English Nationalism (although they only appear to have a strictly cultural definition of ethnicity)

They have Tony Linsell of the Steadfast Trust on board and have two General Election candidates lined up so far. Will they stay the course? That's up to them.